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Thematic Art Project (for high school social studies)

ATT_Compare chopThematic Art Project

Lesson Plan Authors: Karen Marshall and her colleagues at Francis Parker School, San Diego, CA
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade Level: 9
Length of Time: about 9 days

Note: This project is versatile in that it can be used when covering a specific time period or region. In this particular case, my students were exploring Muslim Empires between 1400-1800 CE. My colleagues in the social studies department came up with the concept of this project and I implemented it in the classroom.

Objective

To explore, present, write, and discuss works of art from the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal Empires through a variety of thematic lenses.

Students will be required to work in groups of two (2) for this project, with a group of three (3) being allowed only if class size permits.

Due Dates

Seven days after introducing project: Three-Four Minute Collaborative Presentation
Nine days after introducing project: 300-400 Word Individual Written Response and Graded Class Discussion

Project Components

1. Collaborative Presentation

  • Each group will be given a particular theme from Art Through Time: A Global View
  • Via Art Through Time, each group will read the overview on their theme and watch the supplemental video
  • With an understanding of their theme, each group is required to find five (5) pieces of artwork from either the Safavid, Mughal, and/or Ottoman Empires. The artwork can be from just one empire, two, or all three.
  • The group will present their theme, artwork, and how the artwork embodies/reflects the theme to the class a week after the project is introduced in a three-four minute presentation.
  • Formatting for Visual Presentation
    • Presentations will be created via Google Presentation and shared with teacher
    • Six (6) slides, with five (5) slides devoted to one piece of artwork each
    • At least one of the artwork slides must have a piece of artwork found outside of the Art Through Time website (use the Helpful Sites links below)
    • First slide will include…
      • Group member names
      • One sentence that explains what the theme is about
    • Only text on the artwork slides will be…
      • Title and artist of the artwork
      • What empire the artwork is associated with
      • Proper MLA citation of where artwork was found

2. Individual Writing Assignment

  • Using “COMPARE” feature on the Art Through Time website, each member of the group will choose a different question to write about regarding their theme.
  • When answering the prompt, students will use the two new pieces of artwork given to them and use the “Questions to Consider” as a guide for their response.
  • Response to the prompt will be 300 words typed, double spaced.

3. Graded Class Discussion

  • On Thursday students will come together for a graded class discussion, similar in nature to the Socratic discussions from the beginning of the year, to discuss the themes and artwork. Students will provide their own insights into the role that art plays in our lives and in historical understanding. Students will be graded on the quality of their participation in this class-long discussion.

Helpful Sites

It is important that the artwork used in the presentation comes from a reputable website. Below are three fantastic websites well suited for this project.

Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History (part of the Met Museum)
ARTstor (part of the Francis Parker Library Databases)
Image Quest (part of the Library Databases)

How to Share Ideas From Your Classroom

sharing ideasWe know you create amazing lesson plans and activities using Learner.org resources. Share them with other teachers on the Ideas From Your Classrooms section of our blog.

Submit your lesson plans and activities to blog@learner.org for consideration. We will post a new activity or lesson plan every Tuesday. Check back often to learn about fresh ideas from your peers.

Also, in the Ideas From Your Classrooms section of the blog, we encourage you to comment under lesson plan and activities posts, respond to questions about your classrooms, and support each other with knowledge and advice from your teaching experience.

 

How to Submit a Lesson Plan or Activity

Your plans and activities should state a clear objective, be well-organized, require minimal to no edits, and incorporate a Learner.org resource. (You may also refer to additional resources if desired.) The Learner.org resource you refer to can be a whole series, or part of a series such as an online textbook chapter or video program, an online interactive, or any other resources accessed free on our website. Series titles and urls must be included.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Please include the following information with your materials:

  1. Your name and email address
  2. Title of the activity or lesson plan
  3. Subject/ Class name
  4. Grade level
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Annenberg-Newseum Summer Teacher Institute: Apply Now!

28 Aug 1963, Washington, DC, USA --- More than 200,000 people participated in the March on Washington demonstrations. The throng marched to the Mall and listened to Civil Rights leaders, clergyman and others addressed the crowd, including Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Dates: Wednesday, July 16 – Friday, July 18

Time: 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day

Where: The Newseum, Washington, DC

Cost: FREE

Application Deadline
Applications must be received by 11:59 p.m. on May 26, 2014

  • Participants will be notified by June 6, 2014. Apply Now

In partnership with Annenberg Learner, the Newseum is excited to offer a FREE three-day institute for teachers using new media. This unique professional development opportunity will include hands-on activities, exploration of artifacts from our collection with an archivist, and time to explore the museum independently.

“Speaking of Change” Institute Description
How has freedom of speech been used to spark movements for social change? What techniques have been effective for catalyzing action and securing the historical record? How can you apply these lessons from history to help your students effectively advocate using today’s high- and low-tech tools? Use resources from Annenberg Learner and the Newseum to explore the power of freedom of speech and help your students communicate effectively in traditional and new media.

The institute begins with an examination of speech and social change in history. Teachers analyze various primary sources for expression of freedom of speech and effective techniques. The institute will feature daily curatorial sessions, showcasing primary sources from the Newseum’s extensive collection. Then, participants will look at the opportunities for and challenges of self-expression in today’s media landscape, and use contemporary tools to update historic messages of change. Throughout the workshops, teachers apply what they’ve learned by working with a partner to create a resource or experience to implement during the 2014-2015 school year.

Attendees Will Receive

  • Classroom-ready and adaptable resources to implement into existing curriculum.
  • Strategies to implement Common Core, C3 and national standards aligned curriculum in the classroom including primary source analysis, media literacy and analyzing historical arguments and research.
  • An overview of digital classroom resources from the Newseum and Annenberg Learner in addition to other new media resources that can be used in the classroom.
  • Copies of select primary sources used in the curatorial sessions to take back to the classroom.
  • A private, behind-the-scenes “Tech Tour” of the Newseum’s production and technology centers.
  • A letter of recognition sent to your principal and superintendent.
  • Opportunity to submit a session proposal to present and attend a regional or national conference as the guest of Newseum Education and Annenberg Learner.
  • Access to Newseum Education staff to personalize a field trip for your class.
  • Monthly insider updates from Ed staff on resource, event and program development.

Complimentary breakfast and lunch will be served each day. Teachers outside of the D.C. metro area are encouraged to apply, but transportation and housing are not included.

Eligibility Requirements

  • Middle and high school teachers, librarians or media resource specialists.
  • Active creators of online content, whether through blogs, websites or social communication tools (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, etc.).
  • Note:
    • Applicants are encouraged, but not required, to apply in pairs to foster cross-curricular collaboration within the school or school district
    • The institute is open to all subject areas, but may be of particular interest to language arts and social studies teachers.

Participant Obligation Agreement

In return for attending the Summer Teacher Institute, educators agree to:

Pre-institute

  • Complete a pre-institute survey.
  • Send an introduction via social media — tweets with institute hashtag and a post on a social media platform of their choice (Facebook, Tumblr, etc.).

During the institute

  • Actively tweet or post throughout the day about activities, resources, etc.

Post-institute

  • Write a guest entry on the Newseum and Annenberg Learner education blogs.
  • Co-host a Google Hangout with the Newseum and Annenberg Learner to expand the professional learning community (PLC) and encourage collaboration with teachers around the country.
  • Complete a post-institute survey.
  • Implement the resource or experience created during the institute.
  • Participate in the Newseum’s Teacher Open House on Oct. 4, 2014. Note: Participation can be an additional blog post prior to Teacher Open House highlighting a specific resource, or participating in a panel that day to share effective, classroom-tested strategies using Newseum and Annenberg Learner resources and new media.

Application

  • Participants will be selected via a competitive application process.
  • Applications must be received by 11:59 p.m. on May 26, 2014
  • Participants will be notified by June 6, 2014.

Click here to apply.
Annenberg Learner is the exclusive sponsor of the 2014 Summer Teacher Institute.

(Reposted from the Newseum site.)

Thank you, Leigh!

NCTMquote Heard at NCTM 2014 in New Orleans. Check out the newly updated Against All Odds: Inside Statistics here.

A Teachable Moment: Returning Sacred Artifacts to Their Owners

Pomo basket_AFAnnenberg Foundation trustee Gregory Annenberg Weingarten has purchased sacred artifacts to return them to their Native American owners. Twenty-one of these items will be returned to the Hopi Nation in Arizona, and three artifacts belonging to the San Carlos Apache will be returned to the Apache tribe. Laurel Morales of Fronteras reports that “The Hopi call the ceremonial items friends and believe them to be living spirits.”

For a perspective of the importance of ceremonial items to the tribes they belong to, look to two resources from Annenberg Learner—the educational media arm of the Annenberg Foundation—that describe the ceremonial and cultural significance of native artifacts.

In session 8, “Ceremonial Artifacts,” of the workshop series Artifacts & Fiction, teachers pair religious items with literary texts when teaching students about different cultures and how those cultures change over time. See how two intellectual products produced by members of different Native American tribes—two Pomo Indian gift baskets and Leslie Marmon Silko’s novel Ceremony—are used to help students better understand the beliefs and values of two distinct Native American cultures.

The worldwide art history series, Art through Time, unit 4, “Ceremony and Society,” features an installation of religious items created by members of the Skokomish Indian Nation to conduct a soul recovery ceremony. An explanation of the ceremony and items used begins at 20:00 in the video. Use this video as a point of discussion with students about the importance of preserving these artifacts and how nations use the items for healing, teaching, and reconnecting with their communities.

Examining Students’ Thoughts: An Important Part of Teaching Science (repost)

(Original post on Smithsonian Science Education Center’s STEMVisions blog. STEMVisions highlights ideas, best practices, research and successes in science education.)

By Jannette Alston Monday, August 26, 2013

In my freshman-year biology class in college, my professor asked the 120 students in the room to think about how a tree acquires mass as it grows. I was puzzled, having never been asked this question in previous biology classes, and other students felt the same way and didn’t know the answer. After allowing us to deliberate for a little while, the professor proceeded to show us a video of Harvard and MIT graduates coming up with the wrong answer to this fundamental question about photosynthesis. When the movie provided the correct answer to the question, I recorded it in my notes, kept on moving, and never gave it much thought. Unbeknownst to me at the time, the snippet shown in my class was part of two science programs, produced by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, that examine how and why students have and maintain scientific misconceptions. For example, the students interviewed thought that the cause of the seasons is the change in distance of the Earth from the Sun throughout the Earth’s orbit, when in fact seasons are primarily the result of the tilt of the Earth’s rotational axis.

As an intern at SSEC, I watched both Minds of Our Own and A Private Universe, which investigate a major problem in education: despite being taught basic scientific principles in elementary and middle school, students, upon reaching higher levels of education, still have misconceptions that haven’t been corrected. The programs include in-depth interviews with middle school students that explore the ways in which we think about scientific phenomena and examine the most effective methods of teaching science to children.

A Private Universe

In A Private Universe, students grapple with concepts such as the cause of the seasons and lunar phases. The questions asked of middle school students are posed to Harvard and MIT graduates, many of whom answer incorrectly. A major concern is raised: What can we say about the quality of science education if students in the best colleges do not understand elementary science principles?

The researchers in the program suggest that the way learning happens contributes to this apparent lack of understanding. The interviews demonstrate students are not analogous to “blank slates” for teachers to write on, but the contrary; students’ brains are teeming with theories and notions, and teachers must help students reconstruct ideas rather than writing on these “blank slates” without acknowledging what was there initially. The interviews conducted suggest that many students cling to their personal theories even after being corrected in class, showing that teachers who are unaware of their students’ prior understanding have little ability to fix these misconceptions.

Minds of Our Own: Lessons from Thin Air and Can We Believe Our Eyes

These sentiments are echoed in the Minds of Our Own series, which examines why students miss important concepts even after teachers present these ideas to them in the classroom. Students are asked questions about subjects ranging from photosynthesis to electric currents, and they are perplexed even if the subject has already been covered in their classes. The researcher who narrates the video footage proposes that “even when a teacher explains something slowly, carefully, and clearly, if the student’s thinking isn’t taken into account, students often fail to learn.” This is seen during interviews in which the brightest students from honors courses still have trouble with many scientific concepts.

The programs highlight another dilemma: teachers are inclined to rush through material, meaning that many students get left behind. The pressure to cover a certain amount of curriculum exists, but evidence shows that the more information teachers cram, the less information students actually learn and retain. It’s an unfortunate trade-off that makes me wonder if getting A’s or doing well on standardized tests truly reflect knowledge gained. In Jay Chandler’s honors chemistry class, featured in the video, one can see how right-answer oriented his pupils are: when he asks them what answers they got, the students press him to simply read the answers aloud. He also voices his frustration in preparing students for the Chemistry Achievement Test and not being able to spend time explaining things in great detail. During grade school, cramming information into my head for a test and then forgetting it very soon after is a technique that I often practiced, and I had no problems as a result of doing so until recently. Like Mr. Chandler’s students perhaps, I grew up believing that a teacher would always provide me with the right answers. But my first year at college shocked me: my professors wouldn’t give me the answer; I had to design my own experiments in lab, and adults wanted to hear my opinion. Although this way of learning was frustrating and even daunting, I have enjoyed my courses more because my mind is more engaged and is being challenged.

I recommend that anyone interested in science education watch this thought-provoking series. As a student planning to major in Biology and Education, the fact that I was unable to answer the questions that my professor and these video programs posed startled me. As all effective educators know, understanding how children learn science is an important component of teaching. By allowing students to ask questions, make predictions, design and conduct experiments, interpret their results, discuss and present findings to others—the way scientists do in their careers everyday—students will be engaged and stimulated in a way that has proven to help students retain scientific concepts.

For me, one of the most important lessons that this video series stresses is that children’s ideas are important and shouldn’t be ignored. The classroom should be a safe space for a child to ruminate and think aloud. However, the reality is that science education traditionally emphasizes memorization and regurgitation more and inquiry and exploration less. As the videos show, shifting from the former to the latter is difficult and scary, especially if teachers have been teaching and students have been learning in a certain way for years. But I think it’s a worthwhile change to make if we want to permanently correct students’ misconceptions and allow future generations of students to be literate in science.

Effective Teachers (post by Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory)

CfA effective teachers blog post

A new study shows that teachers who are familiar with misconceptions about science as well as the science itself have students who are much more successful in learning.
Credit: SAO SED

Originally posted Friday, May 03, 2013 by Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory*

Everybody wants teachers to be knowledgeable, but there is little agreement on what kinds of knowledge are the most important. Should a teacher have a deep knowledge of the subject matter, or is it better if the teacher has an understanding of what students think? Is there some optimal combination of different types of knowledge? Discussions of such issues rarely make use of data but instead are based on indirect methods of gauging teacher knowledge. The answer is important: Beliefs about teacher knowledge shape both the policies regulating how teachers are prepared, certified, hired, and evaluated as well as programs that provide ongoing professional development for practicing teachers.

CfA scientists and science educators Phil Sadler, Gerhard Sonnert, Harold Coyle, Nancy Cook-Smith, and Jaime Miller have published a study that quantifies several aspects of teacher knowledge and their relevance to teacher effectiveness. The team finds that one key factor in improving student performance in science understanding is teacher familiarity with the popular science misconceptions. The students of those teachers who both knew the material and understood the reasons for misconceptions improved in their test scores significantly, more than twice as much as students of teachers who only knew the material. The study, which included a sample of 9556 students and 181 teachers, is an important step in evaluating how to train better teachers.

For additional information on this topic, check out the following links:

Science Daily, “Understanding Student Weaknesses”

Education Week, “Knowing Student Misconceptions Key to Science Teaching, Study Finds”

American Education Research Journal, “The Influence of Teachers’ Knowledge on Student Learning in Middle School Physical Science Classrooms”

Learner Express, “A Student Tries to Explain Why There Are Seashells on Top of Mount Everest and the Formation of the Himalayan Mountains”

A Private Universe

Learner Log, “Are you smarter than a Harvard graduate?”

 

*reposted with permission from Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory site with additional links added

Monday Motivation: Teaching Kindergartners to be Story-Tellers

Arts_Bringing Artists_warmups In The Arts in Every Classroom, “Bringing Artists to Your Community,” theatre artist Birgitta De Pree involves a kindergarten class in a storytelling activity that engages the imagination while reinforcing story structure skills. She warms the students up with activities that relax them and build trust. Watch the video until 14:00. While Ms. De Pree served as an artist-in-residence in the school, these engaging activities can be adapted by any language arts teacher willing to take on the role.

7 Ways to Celebrate National Family Month

FAMILYblocksNational Family Month runs from Mother’s Day to Father’s Day, May 12 to June 16 this year. Here are some fun and educational activities from Learner.org that you can do together to build those family bonds:

1. For middle and high school children, choose any of the content courses with Web sites and create a scavenger hunt.  Write questions and have the family search for the answers. Time each person and reward the first person to finish with all the correct answers. Good resources for this activity include:

American Passages: A Literary Survey

Mathematics Illuminated

Earth Revealed

Physics for the 21st Century

America’s History in the Making

The Power of Place: Geography for the 21st Century

Voices and Visions

2. Gaze at the Moon and keep a journal. Use the Moon Journal activity from Looking at Learning… Again to track changes in the moon’s appearance. The pages include questions, materials, and instructions for the activities.

3. Follow the migration of monarch butterflies and report your local sightings on the Journey North site.  Kids have their own page where they can watch videos of monarchs hatching and other natural phenomena.

4. Learn and practice French or Spanish with the family by watching French in Action or Destinos.

5. Document your family’s history and then create a family history quilt as an art project.  The library Arts in Every Classroom, program 12, “Borrowing from the Arts to Enhance Learning,” shows a classroom where students create these quilts. Go to about 22 minutes into the video.

6. Play a board game to help kids learn fractions. You can recreate the Fraction Tracks game shown in program 5 of Teaching Math: A Video Library 5-8.

7. Solve the Eric the Sheep puzzle in this interactive from Learning Math: Patterns, Functions, and Algebra.

 

Share your own inspired ideas by posting them in the comments below.

Teacher Appreciation Story: Why doesn’t my teacher like me?

(contributed by Larisa Kirgan)

Eating Caterpillar“a, a, a, a, a, a, a, b, b, b, b,…”

This is not fair! All of my 3rd grade classmates are spending free time talking, playing games, and in general, having fun. I am stuck at the bulletin board writing the alphabet over and over and over. Why is my handwriting such a big deal? Why doesn’t my teacher like me?

Weeks later, the same teacher informs me that I will be co-hosting the 3rd grade talent show. I am not happy about this. It means more work and speaking in front of a gymnasium full of students and families. She pulls me aside and says, “You can do this. You will have to work hard and put your mind to it. But I know you can do it.” Easy for her to say, she isn’t the one who has to stand on stage. I don’t understand why she keeps picking on me!monarch illustration

It took me several grade levels to mature enough and realize that this teacher was not picking on me at all. On the contrary, she saw something in me that I had not yet. She saw my potential to not just get by, but rather to excel.  She taught me that I had to push myself to be better. Things may not come easy in life, but if I worked hard, practiced and put my mind to it, I could surpass my expectations.

My 3rd grade teacher did not care to be my favorite teacher, instead she wanted me to be the best student I could be.  That made her a GREAT teacher.