Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum

Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum

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Physical Geography: Examining Earth’s Lithosphere

globeundermicroscopeDestructive earthquakes and volcanic eruptions often make headlines and prompt humanitarian relief efforts, though the forces that cause these events are, in fact, mundane and constant. Explore the physical processes operating in the lithosphere, the outer part of the earth that is the base of our continents and oceans. Dig into the following resources to learn about the role of plate tectonics in natural events such as volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, and how humans respond to the risks related to these events.

First, understand the workings of the tectonic plates. Students can study the structure of the lithosphere and plate tectonics using the Dynamic Earth interactive. Find maps of tectonic plates and explore how an earthquake in one area of the world can cause a tsunami in another.

In Earth and Space Science, session 4, “The Engine That Drives the Earth,” join scientists and students as they explore the forces behind volcanoes and earthquakes.

Next, examine humans’ relationship with the land. Witness how the small fishing island of Heimaey, Iceland saved its port from an erupting volcano in 1973. Watch the second half of program 6, “Challenges in the Hinterlands,” from The Power of Place. Start at 14:05 in the video.

Geographers study Tungurahua, a volcano in Ecuador, in order to prevent future tragedies after eruptions. Watch this case study in the second half of workshop 2, “Latin America,” of Teaching Geography. Start at 28:40 in the video.

Additional resources for teaching about the lithosphere:

Earth and Space Science, session 5, “When Continents Collide

Earth Revealed, program 6, “Plate Dynamics” and program 13, “Volcanism”

Learner Express, 40 short video clips with accompanying text. Ten videos on volcanoes and 13 on plate tectonics.

Image copyright: Serp / 123RF Stock Photo

Why do Humans Migrate?

humanmigrateWhy don’t humans stay in one area? The following resources look at the causes of both early and more recent human migrations related to climate, economics, and cultural and political conflict.

Let’s start from the beginning with Bridging World History, unit 3, “Human Migrations.”  What do archeological and linguistic studies tell us about how early humans moved across Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas?

See this animation that explains Human Migration Hypotheses in Rediscovering Biology, unit 9, “Human Evolution.”

Teaching Geography looks at population growth and how cooperation and conflict influence movement across the Earth.  For example, workshop 5, “Sub-Saharan Africa,” features case studies on human migration in Kenya and South Africa.  Workshop, 2, “Latin America,” looks at how both cultural conflict and physical geography influence migrations across Guatemala, Mexico, and Ecuador.

The Power of Place includes several programs on human migration throughout the world. Unit 1, “Introduction: Globalization and World Regions,” Boundaries and Borderlands asks you to consider how the physical location of border towns, economic development, and U.S. border policy help shape human migration between the U.S. and its neighbor Mexico. Unit 10, “North America,” Cityscapes, Suburban Sprawl examines why Boston is full of different ethnicities and how the middle class flight from inner city to suburbia has affected farmland around Chicago.

The full list of regions covered in The Power of Place can be found on the website homepage.

Share other resources and activities you use to teach about human migration in the comments below.

Project Based Learning Activity: Environmental Studies

Habitable Planet_water_screenThis post is written by Bill Fischelis, Director of Curriculum and Learning at NU Vision School

This past fall and winter the students at NU Vision School in Boston used The Habitable Planet series from Annenberg Learner as one of the major resources for their environmental science class project, explained in this post.

NU Vision School is a partnership between Northeastern University and the Boston Ballet for students of the Boston Ballet’s pre-professional program. Not only do we help the students balance their rigorous dance schedules with a strong academic program, but we challenge the students to think about their learning in new ways. Our curriculum is project based and driven by the interests of the students.

As part of the environmental science class, students chose a country that interested them and then developed a meaningful project around their exploration. Five of the students decided to make a website as a way to demonstrate their learning and share their knowledge. Below are the links to the five websites.

As part of their research, all the students began by learning basic geography and population factors about their country; these are included in the websites. They also picked one to three environmental factors that were of interest and of particular concern in their chosen country. These factors and how they are impacting society, the natural environment, personal well-being, and the economy are then explained.

We adapted a rubric from the BUCK Institute to inform and assess this project.

These websites are not meant to be finished products. With feedback and additional knowledge the students will continue to edit and add to them. They will appreciate all thoughts you have.

Please share feedback either about the students’ sites (make sure to reference a specific site by country) or the project itself in the comments section of this blog post.

Student Websites:

Aleena (9th grade) – Nicaragua

Allison (9th grade) – Pakistan

Noa (9th grade) – France

Skye  (9th grade) – USA

Tessa (10th grade) – Russia

Where in the World: A Story of a Geologist’s Ingenuity

Do you know where this is? Both pictures are of the same island. The first photo shows a normal, peaceful day and the second shows a volcanic eruption that threatened this bustling fishing harbor. Follow this link to Power of Place, program 6, “Challenges in the Hinterlands,” for an amazing story of a geologist’s ingenuity that saved the harbor. (see 19:16 to 21:06 in the video)

Power of Place_IcelandBoat

Power of place_IcelandEruption

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Activity: Travel the Globe with Latitude Shoes

JN_latitude_shoesCheck out this writing project that’s a fun way to learn about latitude. Kathy Corn recently participated with her students at Mills River, Sugarloaf, and Hillandale Elementary schools in North Carolina.

 

 

 

 

“People everywhere are invited to put on a pair of Latitude Shoes and go for a ride. What would you see if you traveled around the world at your latitude? Write a story about your 24-hour adventure.

  • How fast and how far will you go?
  • Who lives at your latitude?
  • What countries will you visit?
  • What languages will you hear?
  • What seasons do you experience and what clothes do you need?
  • Everyone has the same photoperiod at your latitude, how does the climate compare?”

On the Journey North Web site, the page for this activity includes materials for the full activity; the science, reading and writing, and geography standards connections; a link to share your students’ stories; and a gallery of students’ illustrations and writing. This assignment could be used to assess what students have learned during Journey North’s Mystery Class.